Secured Open Source Embedded Software

This presentation was given at AGL All Member Meeting in Monte Carlo, Monaco.

In the embedded world, the tricky part of development is often located at the hardware/software interface. Indeed, directly testing software on the final target is not always possible. So, it can lead to an increase in time-to-market.

Virtualization ensures early code integration in a target, but existing tools are either incomplete or require hardware virtualization knowledge. This is why Iot.bzh is evaluating open-source solutions, allowing AGL application developers to remotely test code easily on emulated and real boards.

So, this presentation outlines the results of this study. Then focuses on the different possible targets given to developers to test their code : QEMU, specific SystemC emulated boards and real hardware boards, all running an AGL stack.

Download slides [click here]

 

This presentation was given at AGL All Member Meeting in Monte Carlo, Monaco.

Cars remain expensive, customers expect long warranty and strong aftersales services. For OEMs car development costs increase making short term profits impossible. They must leverage software update to add new features while keeping same hardware during minimum 5 years of serial life. So, OEMs LTS contract requirements may quickly extend to 20 years.

Cybersecurity legislation moves. Following European Cybersecurity Act, the ENISA passed a cybersecurity certification schema. If until now OEMs had limited interest in this topic, they will be forced to take seriously into consideration these new legal constraints and propose security patches during the whole vehicle lifetime.

This talk details the reasons why these new trends are important for OEMs and exposes how based on lessons learnt IoT.bzh proposes a solution to fulfill LTS and cybersecurity certifications requirements.

Download slides [click here]

Show Redpesk Video [click here]

 

This presentation was given at Automotive Linux Submit in Tokyo.

AGL natively supports secure micro-services through its Application Framework binder/binding mechanism. A ready to go system may easily run tens or hundreds of micro-services. Consequently monitoring exchanges between binders/bindings is critical. Monitoring may need to be “realtime” to help debugging, or offline when tracking global performances and security issues.

This talk starts by presenting current AGL Application Framework monitoring capabilities to track basic inter-bindings communications. It then exposes how existing supervision service can be used to analyze end-to-end transactions when crossing multiple bindings. Finally it illustrates how AGL supervision can leverage Time Serie Database to collect data, allowing monitoring frameworks like Grafana to render a global vision of the system both in term of performance and cybersecurity.

Download slides [click here]

 

This presentation was given at Automotive Linux Submit in Tokyo.

In order to embrace the global automotive ecosystem, AGL micro-services architecture should support not only all Linux in a car, but also seamlessly retrieve data from small ECUs and securely send collected information to the cloud.

Because of existing application framework dependencies, as today, AGL bindings run only on Linux. In order to extend to global automotive ecosystem, AGL’s binders/bindings architecture needs to be reviewed. On one hand, remove Linux’s systemD dependencies and extend security model. On a second hand, support ‘alien’ transport protocols including non TCP/IP ones.

This talk presents the lesson learned from a POC to run a subset of current AGL binder onto a micro-controller with Zephyr. How to solve binder/binding dependencies, how to map the transport onto a non TCP/IP link, how to extend AGL security model, ...

Download slides [click here]

 

As today, AGL mostly leverages Wayland IVI-shell as inherited from Genivi. Worse than having technical limitations, the main issue of IVI-Shell is the persistent lack of interest from the Wayland community. As a result, the IVI-shell ailed to gain adoption from any generic software like browsers or well known social/media applications. Since the early days of Wayland, new options appear to better support compositors/wm.

On one hand, Gnome and KDE ship their own flavour of compositor/wm; nevertheless those solutions remain too monolithic and too desktop centric for the embedded world.

On the other hand Wlroots was designed upfront, not as a Wayland compositor/wm but as a foundation to create compositor. Furthermore, because it’s more recent, the authors were able to leverage the lesson learnt from older toolkit as Weston or WLC and created a far more advanced and flexible toolkit.

Download Slides [here]

Demo video [here]

 

Archived Publications

About us

Our redpesk® product: a software factory in a white box enabling you to speed up and control your embedded developments from the initial design cycle to your product end of life.

Contact information

IoT.bzh

Halles St Louis,
    rue Docteur Bodelio
56100 Lorient
02 57 62 02 47